Recent Posts

Storm damage is no game

12/12/2018 (Permalink)

Storm damage can happen anywhere, not too long ago hurricane Micheal decided to come through the Florida pan handle coming up through the states of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi following all the other hurricanes. He left a lot of water on the ground all throughout our six counties. We had three water damages come from Micheal, and they were all from, trees hitting the roof and making the water come through the roof going all the way down through the houses. These problems can be prevented by trimming any of the trees that branches could land on your roof, and cut down all the trees that count crush your house have them no closer than 20-30 feet away from your house. Doing this could prevent a major storm damage, if the tree were to land on your house you'd have to call SERVPRO, then after us you would need a contractor, and he'd have to build you a new roof, which could all be prevented.

how to use: a fire place

12/11/2018 (Permalink)

STEP 1: Stay Safe
Before bringing out the lighter, it’s vital to understand safety precautions for using a fireplace. First, always double-check that your fire extinguisher, smoke detector, and carbon monoxide detector are each in working order (check those batteries!). Remove anything flammable within three feet of the fireplace in case stray sparks escape the hearth, and use a fireplace screen as well. Make sure the flue isn’t blocked by obstructions like an animal’s nest, especially if this is your first time using the fireplace. If the system hasn’t been recently inspected, hire a chimney sweep certified by the Chimney Safety institute of America (CSIA) to do the job.

STEP 2: Gather the Kindling
Gather kindling in a variety of sizes (small, medium, and large) for the proper fire-building technique that is outlined below. To emit less smoke and soot, make sure the wood is dry, well-seasoned, and split a minimum of six months ago. You can choose either hardwood or softwood for the fire; while hardwoods like oak or maple burn longer and create more sustained heat, softwoods like cedar or pine start fires easier because they ignite quickly. Whatever you don’t use can return to the firewood rack, best stored outdoors in an elevated and covered location.

Note: Never burn trash, plastic, painted materials, or anything with chemical treatment like scraps of pressure-treated wood—these materials can release harmful chemicals into your home.

STEP 3: Open the Damper
The damper is a movable plate inside the flue. When opened, it allows the smoke and ash to travel safely up the chimney. If you start a fire with a closed damper, however, the smoke will have no escape route and circle back into the house.

Adjust the damper as needed with the handle located inside of the chimney. It will move either front to back, left to right, or in a clockwise or counterclockwise rotation. Check to make sure you opened it properly by sticking your head in the flue and looking upwards, using a flashlight if necessary. You should see up the flue without any obstructions if the damper is open; a closed damper will block your view entirely.

STEP 4: Prime the Flue
Now, gauge the temperature. If you feel a rush of cold air (which usually occurs if the chimney is built on the outside of the house), then you need to prime the flue—in order words, you need to preheat it. Otherwise, the cold draft may cause smoke to blow into the room. Light a roll of newspaper and hold it against the open damper to send warm air into the flue. The draft should reverse after a few minutes, making your fireplace ready for action.

STEP 5: Build the Fire 
While there are multiple ways to build a fire, the CSIA recommends the top-down method, which produces less smoke and requires less tending. Start by donning thick fireplace gloves and grabbing a metal poker. Position large pieces of wood in the bottom of the fireplace in one row, perpendicular to the opening of the fireplace. Next, take mid-sized pieces of wood, and stack four or five rows on top of the base layer in alternating directions. Make sure the stack takes up no more than half the height of your fireplace. Now add your smallest pieces of wood, making sure these pieces are very dry. The tiniest bits (which can take the form of wood shavings or bunched-up newspapers) should be at the very top.

Light the top of the stack with a single match. The fire should travel down, igniting the pieces underneath without prompting. Let the fire burn for as long as you’d like. Don’t close the damper until the fire is completely out and all the embers have stopped burning.

STEP 6: Clean the Ashes 
The CSIA says you can leave a bed of ashes between one to two inches in the fireplace as an insulating layer, which helps the next fire to burn. But when you need to dispose of ashes, proceed with caution. Coals may take several hours or several days to completely cool, and ash could still be burning during that time. Using a metal shovel, scoop ashes into a metal container with a tight-fitting lid. Store the container outdoors away from the house, and not in trash cansor on decks.

Following these steps could avoid a major fire damage.

Moisture Control is Key to Mold Control

12/11/2018 (Permalink)

  • Keep humidity levels as low as you can—no higher than 50%--all day long. An air conditioner or dehumidifier will help you keep the level low. Humidity levels change throughout the day as changes occur in the moisture in the air and the air temperature, so check the humidity levels more than once a day.
  • If you see condensation or moisture collecting on windows, walls or pipes ACT QUICKLY to dry the wet surface and reduce the moisture/water source.  Condensation can be a sign of high humidity.
  • Be sure your home has enough ventilation. Use exhaust fans, which vent outside your home in the kitchen and bathroom. Make sure your clothes dryer vents outside your home.
  • Fix any leaks in your home’s roof, walls, or plumbing so mold does not have moisture to grow.
  • Clean up and dry out your home thoroughly and quickly (within 24–48 hours) after flooding.
  • Remove or replace carpets and upholstery that have been soaked and cannot be dried promptly. Consider not using carpet in rooms or areas like bathrooms or basements that may have a lot of moisture. 

Call SERVPRO of Centreville, Marion, and Selma at 205-926-6010 to remediate your mold growth.

Weather in Alabama

12/4/2018 (Permalink)

Living in Alabama we never know if its going to be freezing, warm or hot outside, what ever Alabama decides to do you need to be prepared for freezing pipes. One way to avoid freezing pipes is to barely leave your sink faucet on where its dripping water. if you have a crawlspace, and not a concrete slab, you can take a small mini heater and place it right inside to make it warm under your house. Another way to avoid freezing pipes is to purchase heating tape from your local, Lowes, Home Depot, or Hard wear store. the wrap it around your pipes and plug it in which will allow the pipes to stay fairly warm. One last way to avoid busting pipes is insulate your pipes to avoid cold freezing air from flowing past your pipes.

Mold Remediation

11/9/2018 (Permalink)

Mold all together can appear anywhere it can come from any type of moister buildup whether its from rain, dew, or anything else, and also it can grow in dark places that being said Mold, is a nasty thing, it can cause pain, or allergic reactions to anyone. Mold is in just about every house, business, and just about any other building in Alabama because of the humidity,rain and other various weather patterns we have down here in the south. If you even think you see mold, smell it, or anything dealing with mold you need to call SERVPRO of Centreville, Marion, and Selma right away. SERVPRO of Centreville, Marion, and Selma is always here to help. Our professionals know how to properly take care of your mold needs, leaving your house clean, and smelling amazing. 

Why SERVPRO?

10/29/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Centreville, Marion, and Selma understands the stress when you have a water damage in your business or home. That is why we are available 24/7 to help. Our team is fast and quick to any job at any size. 
Our certified technicians will mitigate the damage to prevent mold, mildew or bacteria. Using EPA disinfectants, we will make your business or home safe to reenter and occupy. We make sure our team is trained and up to date with all of their credentials. 
SERVPRO of Centreville, Marion, and Selma has been trusted by local business's and insurance companies to assist with their water damage projects. We are there when your family needs help the most. Any type of damage in your home can be a devastating time and can cause a lot of stress in the household. Working with true professionals can definitely help the process and get your home back to normal as quickly as possible. 
If you have emergency water damage or fire damage needs, please call us now SERVPRO of Centreville, Marion and Selma 205-926-6010

safety during the holidays

10/17/2018 (Permalink)

For many people November is a time to enjoy cooler temperatures, beautifully colored leaves and family oriented get togethers, like Thanksgiving. While you are busy whipping up delicious dishes, it is also important to take time to remember safety.

Cooking fires are the leading cause of home fires and home fire-related injuries in the United States. The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) reports U.S. fire departments respond to an average of 357,000 home structure fires each year. 45% of these fires are attributed to home cooking fires. These fires are also responsible for thousands of injuries and more than $6.9 billion in property damage each year.

Please remember to be as safe as possible and take precautions during the upcoming holiday season.

Simple ways to avoid a water damage

9/19/2018 (Permalink)

Be careful with planting trees

Planting trees may not be that popular, but if you are looking to add some shade to help your home cool down in those summer months, Be careful of trees with invasive roots. Trees with invasive roots can cause problems with irrigation problems, pipes and even septic tanks.

Keep an eye on your water bill

It is always a good idea to monitor your water bill regularly. That can be the best indication of a leak that you might not know about.

Chemicals may not be the best thing when unclogging your sink

Clogs happen. Everyone experiences them and those unclogging chemicals are extremely handy but they can eat away at pipes causing future problems. If you can avoid those chemicals and try using a drain snake instead.

Never pour grease down your sink

Grease can be harmful to pipes if it hardens inside the trap and cause back ups. Even if you think diluting grease with water would help, it doesn't. The best thing for grease is to put it in a disposable container and let it harden before you throw it away.

Have you checked behind your sink or washer lately?

9/19/2018 (Permalink)

Do you ever look under you sink? All the way in the back behind the toilet paper and various cleaning products? What about pulling the washer away from the wall and looking behind that?

A lot of time you can have a water damage and not even realize it. That was the case in this job. Our customer had a leak in the wall behind his sink and didn't realize it until he tried to sell his home, and a home inspector found it, because it went unnoticed, mold grew and had to be fully re-mediated.

Leaks in the wall are hard to notice but there are some things to look for. Baseboard separation in one of the easiest things to spot. The baseboard swells up from the water and pulls away from the wall. 

Peeling paint or paint flaking away. These are easy to see but a very good indication of a potential water leak. 

Lastly, any sort of discoloration. If you are unsure if you have wet building material, call your local SERVPRO franchise for a moisture inspection.

Smoke alarm safety

7/9/2018 (Permalink)

The National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) reports nearly two-thirds of these fire-related deaths occurred in homes with no working smoke alarm or no smoke alarms present at all. Smoke alarms play a vital role in saving lives, and when they are properly installed, can reduce the risk of fire injury in half.

The NFPA recommends smoke alarms be installed in every bedroom, outside all sleeping quarters and on every level of the house.

Business owners should consult the local Fire Marshall to ensure specific building fire codes and smoke detector requirements are met.

Once smoke alarms are in place, it is important to maintain and regularly test the alarms to ensure they are in the proper working order. Review the tips provided here regarding smoke detector installation and maintenance.

Smoke alarms work best when paired with a fire escape plan. A preparedness plan allows your family, employees, or clients to escape quickly and safely in an emergency situation. For tips or information on emergency preparedness, contact SERVPRO of Centreville, Marion and Selma at 205-926-6010

Smoke Alarm Tips:

    • Install smoke alarms inside every bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
    • Smoke alarms should be installed away from the kitchen to prevent false alarms. Generally, they should be at least 10 feet from a cooking appliance.
    • Test smoke detectors at least once a month using the test button
    • Replace batteries in all smoke alarms at least once a year. If an alarm “chirps,” warning the battery is low, replace the battery right away
  • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old